LOCKMED Offers Back to School Advice to Parents on Safeguarding Medications in the Home 

MEDIA ANNOUNCEMENT

LOCKMED Media Contact: Tammy Goffin

Marketing Director, tammy@lockmed.com

 

Pittsburgh, PA, August, 2016 – As we head into a new school year, LOCKMED Medical Product Company wants to remind parents of the importance of safeguarding medications in the home.

Back to school is an exciting time for many but it can also be a vulnerable time for kids, especially teenagers. Making new friends, keeping good grades, competitive sports, and getting into college, can cause undue stress and anxiety for students who may begin to experiment with drugs, especially prescription medications. In fact, a 2013 survey by the Partnership for Drug Free kids found that 1 in 4 teens has misused prescription drugs.

Teens turn to drugs for a variety of reasons including curiosity, as a study aid, to sleep better, peer pressure, to get high at a party, and pain relief from injuries. Often they assume prescription drugs aren’t as dangerous as illicit drugs. However, continued misuse can not only lead to addiction, but accidental overdoses. Nearly 15,000 people die each year of overdoses involving prescription painkillers – more than deaths due to car crashes (according to the CDC).

“We want to educate and inform parents so they have the tools to help combat the drug abuse problem and prevent accidental overdoses in the home,” stated M. Bud Lateef, MD, a pain management specialist and founder of LOCKMED, a company that produces home medication lock boxes.

Often teens will get medications from family and friends, taken from an unlocked bathroom medicine cabinet, bedroom nightstand or kitchen shelf without detection. LOCKMED strongly encourages everyone to always lock up medications in the home, and to remind caregivers and family to keep medications locked up and away from children.

“All medications, including over-the-counter meds, need to be secured and stored out of reach from children,” said M. Bud Lateef, MD. “Kids can stumble upon pills that look like candy and colorful liquid medication and have an accidental overdose.”

Lockmed recommends the following tips for a safer home:

  1. Don’t tell many people about your medication types.

Keeping your prescription types private may help in preventing unwanted attention to your medications. Not telling others about your medications will also keep your medical problems private.

  1. Don’t give many people access to your medications.

Minimize the number of people who help you with your medications.

  1. Know how much medication you have.

Do a routine count of your medications on a regular basis to make sure none are missing.

  1. Discard unused medications properly.

If your treatment is complete or you are not using certain strong medications any longer, properly discard them to reduce the amount of medications in the home.

  1. Lock up your medications.

Lock up and safeguard your medications at home.

  1. Educate kids about the dangers of medications.

Proactively engage children about the dangers of medications and why they should be avoided to prevent accidental exposures.

  1. 1 (800) 222-1222

Keep this number for the national, toll-free poison helpline easily available and programmed in your cell phone for use in a poison emergency or simply to answer questions related to medications or other poisons.

About LOCKMED:

LOCKMED Medical Product Company, a Pittsburgh-based medical technology company, has been developing award winning products to safeguard medications since 2008. Their medication security products have been used and trusted by thousands of facilities and institutions nationwide. LOCKMED lock boxes are available in a variety of sizes and can be purchased directly from the company’s website or through over 120 LOCKMED dealers throughout the U.S., Canada, Australia, and Europe. To learn more about LOCKMED Medication Lock Boxes, visit www.lockmed.com, https://facebook.com/LockMed or call 888-458-2746. To schedule interview opportunities with Dr. M. Bud Lateef, contact Tammy@lockmed.com.

 

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LOCKMED and Pittsburgh Poison Center Collaboration Aims to Increase Awareness of the Need to Safeguard Medications at Home

Pittsburgh, PA, May 26, 2016 – LOCKMED Medical Product Company announced today its collaboration with the Pittsburgh Poison Center (PPC). This endeavor will emphasize the importance of locking up all prescription and over the counter drugs at home, a major focal point for both organizations.

LOCKMED is a Pittsburgh-based company that produces home medication lock boxes. These medication lock boxes were developed to help curb the growing prescription drug abuse problem by safeguarding and reducing access to medications at home.

Data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that in 2014, nearly two million Americans were dependent on or abused prescription opioids. Additionally, almost 1,000 people are treated daily in emergency rooms for using these types of drugs in a manner other than directed by a physician.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) – the organization that supports the nation’s 55 poison control centers, including the PPC – in 2014, 57% of the 2.2 million reported human exposures involved medications, or pharmaceuticals.

“Through this partnership, we will continue to educate the public on the importance of safeguarding prescription drugs at home to help prevent diversion of medications,” stated LOCKMED founder and pain management specialist, M. Bud Lateef, MD.

The PPC’s mission is to promote poisoning prevention through educational programs for the public, as well as training seminars to healthcare professionals. Their belief is that it is better to prevent an accidental poisoning than to treat one.  Mr. Yuk’s iconic face, developed in Pittsburgh, continues to serve poison and drug education and prevention projects at the Pittsburgh Poison Center as well as programs throughout the country.

“This was an easy and obvious connection,” said Michael Lynch, MD, medical director for the Pittsburgh Poison Center. “Many medications found in the home can easily be taken by family and friends, or mistaken by children. One of our key messages is to keep medications up high, out of reach, and locked away.”

The hopes of both organizations are to work together through education, published materials, social media, and outreach efforts to alert everyone to the dangers of and need to safeguard medications.

LOCKMED lock boxes are available in a variety of sizes and can be purchased directly from the company’s website or through over 100 LOCKMED dealers throughout the U.S., Canada, Australia, and Europe. For more information, visit www.lockmed.com.

If you need poison help or information, dial 1-800-222-1222. Your call will be answered by a health care professional at the Pittsburgh Poison Center or a poison center near you.

 

About LOCKMED

LOCKMED Medical Product Company, a Pittsburgh-based medical technology company, has been developing award winning products to safeguard medications since 2008. Their medication security products have been used and trusted by thousands of facilities and institutions nationwide. To learn more about LOCKMED Medication Lock Boxes, visit www.lockmed.com, https://facebook.com/LockMed or call 888-458-2746. To schedule interview opportunities with Dr. M. Bud Lateef, contact Tammy@lockmed.com.

About the Pittsburgh Poison Center

The Pittsburgh Poison Center answers calls 24 hours-a-day, seven days a week and serves nearly 6 million residents in 44 counties of Pennsylvania. The center receives approximately 100,000 calls each year. It also developed a hospital-based poison treatment system involving 70 hospitals in western Pennsylvania. Several national businesses and industrial corporations rely on the center for poison consultation. Poison Center staff are highly trained clinical toxicology nurse specialists.  You can follow the Pittsburgh Poison Center at www.facebook.com/mryukpgh and www.twitter.com/mryukpgh.  Free Mr. Yuk stickers are available upon request.  Please call for details.  For media, interview or collaboration opportunities with Dr. Michael Lynch and other poison center leadership, please email mryuk@upmc.edu.

 

Disclaimer: The primary purpose of this material is for general informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of any particular product by the PPC (part of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center). 

 

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Both LOCKMED and the Pittsburgh Poison Center encourage everyone to follow these steps for a safer home:

 

  1. Don’t tell many people about your medication types.

Keeping your prescription types private may help in preventing unwanted attention to your medications. Not telling others about your medications will also keep your medical problems private.

  1. Don’t give many people access to your medications.

Minimize the number of people who help you with your medications.

  1. Know how much medication you have.

Do a routine count of your medications on a regular basis to make sure none are missing.

  1. Discard unused medications properly.

If your treatment is complete or you are not using certain strong medications any longer, properly discard them to reduce the amount of medications in the home.

  1. Lock up your medications.

Lock up and safeguard your medications at home.

  1. Educate kids about the dangers of medications.

Proactively engage children about the dangers of medications and why they should be avoided to prevent accidental exposures.  Use a standard symbol, like Mr. Yuk, to indicate dangerous drugs and chemicals.

  1. 1(800)222-1222

Keep this number for the national, toll-free poison helpline easily available and programmed in your cell phone for use in a poison emergency or simply to answer questions related to medications or other poisons.

 

LOCKMED Media Contact: Tammy Goffin

Marketing Director, tammy@lockmed.com

LOCKMED to be an Event Sponsor for the 2016 National Rx Drug Abuse Summit

LOCKMED is proud to be an Event Sponsor for the 2016 Rx Drug Abuse Summit which is the largest collaboration of US Government leaders that meet annually regarding the rising prescription drug abuse problem. LOCKMED is committed to highlighting the need to safeguard medications at home in an effort to reduce prescription drug abuse. Unsecured medications at home has been a source of diversion and abuse of prescription drugs.  Visit us at http://www.lockmed.com to learn more about LOCKMED’s efforts on reducing prescription drug abuse or about of products to safeguard medications at home or during travel.

LOCKMED partners with Safe Kids Gainesville/Hall County to hand out medication lock boxes in Georgia

lock med drug boxes bag prescription drugs lock box

We’re proud to announce our support of RAYSAC (Roanoke Area Youth Substance Abuse Coalition) and how they’ve been using LOCKMED boxes in their community:

  • We have given 15 boxes to local high schools for Prevention Clubs to distribute as part of their mini-grant requirements.
  •  Several were given away at a Global Youth Service Day event on April 12, 2014.  The focus of this event was domestic violence and it included a Peace Pace walk and information fair.
  •  On April 26, we gave out 12 lockboxes at the DEA Prescription Drug Take Back event held valley-wide.   More than 2,000 lb of drugs were taken back at this event and kept out of our waterways and out of the hands of youth!
  •  We have also given several to our community partners to use in their education programs and to display at their offices.  These include local hospital youth education programs, the Department of Social Services, Juvenile Court Programs, local law enforcement, and Youth of Virginia Speak Out (YOVASO) — to name a few.”

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How to Keep Your Medicine Cabinet Protected

How to Keep Your Medicine Cabinet Protected

medcabinet

Abuse of prescription as well as over the counter drugs is rampant these days and what’s more disturbing is that an increasing number of young people are abusing medications to get high. Many parents think that the street is where the youngsters get their drugs but the truth is many are getting their drugs in their very own homes. This is why it is important that you safeguard your medicine cabinet always.

Here are ways on how you can safeguard your medicine cabinet and help prevent your children from getting hooked on both prescription and over the counter medications.

How to Safeguard Your Medicine Cabinet

Do an inventory. You should take the time to document and keep track of the prescription and over the counter drugs you keep in your home. Count the number of pills in every bottle and every packet. Take note of these commonly abused drugs and make sure that you pay close attention to them.

  • Adderall and other stimulants

  • Painkillers such as vicodin

  • Medicines for cough and colds

Be in control of your child’s medicine. There will come a time when your teen will need to take medicines whether prescribed or over the counter, to beat an illness. You should see to it that you monitor the dosage and be the one to get refills if needed. Be watchful and observant especially when it comes to medications for cough. If symptoms of cough and colds are already gone but your teen still asks for the medication, be suspicious.

Get your entire family involved. Inform your relatives and other people who frequently stay in your home or host your teen in your home about the risk for prescription and over the counter drug abuse. Grandparents must be included since most elderly people take more medications. Teach them how to keep track of the medicines they keep in their homes and how to properly keep them out of sight and out of other people’s reach.

Keep them locked. It would be best to keep all medicines in a storage area where they can be locked. You can get a medicine box with a lock in it and keep all your medicines there then keep the box in a place such as a cabinet or drawer with also a lock in it. Do your best to encourage other parents especially parents of your teen’s friends to do the same.

Additional Tips

Discard with caution. When throwing away expired medicines, you should be very careful. Don’t just throw expired or not needed medicines in their bottles or in packets in the trash as teens may rummage through the trash to get them. Flushing them down the toilet is also not a good idea since this practice harms the environment. Before throwing medicines in the trash, mix them with undesirable items like kitty litter then throw them out when your teen is not around. Your community may also have pharmaceutical take back activities or solid waste programs in place. They serve as great opportunities for you to discard expired or not needed prescription and over the counter drugs.

Be careful when throwing out prescription notes from your doctor. It may be best to just tear them out. You should also remove personal information on labels to prevent anyone including your teens from getting unauthorized refills.

Talk to your teens calmly. If you start noticing medications missing in your home or you notice your medicine packaging in your teen’s room and or belongings or if your teen is still using medicines even when he or she is already better, talk to them in a calm manner. Don’t shout at your child, don’t be angry. Let them know that you are concerned and you want to help them.

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